Sujal Manohar

I have always been an artist. While my background is in more traditional art forms such as drawing and painting, I also utilize mixed media, photography, collage, and graphic design to tell my stories. As a visual arts and neuroscience graduate of Duke University, I don’t think these fields are mutually exclusive. Instead, I live and thrive at their intersection, finding that the arts, sciences, and health can overlap in meaningful ways.

 

I aim to impact the larger community through my artwork, as visual forms have the power to depict abstract issues in a tangible way, starting the conversation and changing culture. I am interested in using the arts to raise awareness about health conditions and fight stigma, creating detailed artwork with embedded layers of meaning. I often work with people impacted by illness or disability and capture personal experiences. In the future, I aim to utilize the arts to empathize and communicate with patients.

 

For my senior visual arts thesis project, I raised awareness about mental health experiences, both positive and negative, particularly in a Duke University context. I hope my work helps the community understand and reflect about mental health in a more personal and human way. To inform my artwork, I conducted fifteen interviews with Duke students, staff, and healthcare professionals about their mental health journeys.

 

My drawings are also inverted, showing the version of the story we usually don’t see. With the dark backgrounds and white lines, the work invokes a clinical feel similar to x-rays and medical images—an ironic connection since these technologies are never used to diagnose mental health conditions. These inverted drawings will also encourage viewers to find their silver lining regarding mental health and emphasize that they are not alone.

Duke University – BA/BS

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Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art

750 Marguerite Drive, Winston-Salem, NC 27106

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SECCA is an affiliate of the North Carolina Museum of Art and a division of the NC Department of Natural & Cultural Resources. SECCA receives operational funding from The Arts Council of Winston-Salem and Forsyth County. Additional funding is provided by the James G. Hanes Memorial Fund.

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